Jump to content
Aveyond Studios Community

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 01/16/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    Glad to see you back, @AK-i. Hope the new job is a good one. I've created the Currency Type database. The first value in the list is your primary currency. Here is how you can assign currency to an affix: As some of you have mentioned, values assigned to affixes will also need to be available to items directly. I've been thinking about how to solve this problem and I think the answer is to modify HeroKit so that you can have properties under properties. I'm going to explore this issue over the weekend. @Zebbi, I also need to create another UFPS action, so that will be coming soon.
  2. 2 points
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    Are you guys familiar with relational and non-relational databases? A HeroObject has a non-relational database attached to it. It’s hierarchical. Instead of adding new levels to this hierarchy, I’m going to use a relational database structure to connect the non-relational databases. So, a group of fields in the affixes database will actually exist in another database called attributes. The attributes database will be linked to both the affixes and items databases. I’m going to test this tonight, but it should work. @Duffer123, affix type will determine what type of affix we are creating. If an item can have an affix attached to it, you can select the affix type. This will generate a list of affixes of that type. This currated list will appear in a drop-down list in the Items database. The details are still vague until I get affixes properly connected to items. The final structure will also be used for sockets and their attachments. You will get to add your own affix and socket types.
  3. 2 points
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    I'll get to the more complex stats soon. Right now I'll continue to clean up current fields. Tonight I created a separate database for Meters. Meters are stats like Health, Mana, Exp. Meters can have a base, current, and max value. Next on the agenda: Database for currency so you can change which currency (or currencies) to assign to an affix. @Duffer123 will meters work for your vitals? Next on the short list: elements (needed for resistances).
  4. 2 points
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    Guys, I've move stats into their own database. So now you don't have to have attack, physical defense, etc. You can have whatever you want. And you can add up to 20 of them. Check out how you can now add them in the Affix Database: Did you want to include Health and Mana as stats?
  5. 2 points
    ChiaPet

    Ant's Journal

    To add to Duffer's suggestion, in general, I would prefer a framework within HeroKit that allows me to define item modifiers in a more freeform manner, rather than having a bunch of pre-defined ones that may or may not be applicable to the game I'm developing. I recognize that by giving more freedom, there are more guard rails that may need to be imposed with respect to the procedural order of implementing these effects. But the tradeoff to me is more than worth it.
  6. 2 points
    Duffer123

    Ant's Journal

    @Ant, I'll try... So allowing the user to define their own stats, attributes, points, class ranks, skills, abilities, whatever in the appropriate database(s) and then allowing them to say what and how many stats of whatever type are effected and however by the item, the affix, the socket... ?
  7. 1 point
    callmedan

    Ahriman's Prophecy (REBOOT)

    @cruelcore1 Sorry for late reply but I have already finished music for the reboot. Anyway, thank you for your offer @Mickychi Photobucket changed their terms and that cause the problem with the image. If you're using Chrome, you can install this add-on and the images will show up https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/photobucket-hotlink-fix/kegnjbncdcliihbemealioapbifiaedg And I'm slowly working on the game FYI, since I decided to do my final project this semester so I don't have much time for it. I'm currently refining several maps and creating some events. I'm pretty sure that I saw you on RPG Maker forums (?), you can see me asking for advice there sometimes
  8. 1 point
    Mickychi

    Ahriman's Prophecy (REBOOT)

    Some of your earlier pictures in the thread aren't showing up for me properly - it's saying "please update your account to allow third party hosting". Also I would just like to ask how the project is coming along
  9. 1 point
    ChiaPet

    Ant's Journal

    Awesome. Yeah, I'm worried about unwieldy, or just plain dumb-sounding names if all of the affix names get attached.
  10. 1 point
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    At this point, I’m not going to have affixes auto change the name of an item. I was, but the names could get very very long. So instead, the developer will need to follow a naming convention of choice when creating items. If I re-add the ability to generate random items, I’ll need to take another look at auto adding affixes specifically for those items.
  11. 1 point
    Ishti

    Ask Anything!

    Heh heh heh. The immortals' book club tea party: Te'ijal, Galahad, Gavin, Ishtar, and the Oracle. Heptitus will crash the party because she wants to know why she wasn't invited. Hercules... same deal. Gyendal will lurk outside the window and wonder whether they're talking about him. Galahad will have a generally awful time because everyone at this tea party has an unusual sense of morality - but for the sake of the party, all differences are meant to be put aside. What's the best thing you've ever cooked?
  12. 1 point
    ChiaPet

    Ant's Journal

    They are essentially referring to the modifier type with respect to where the modifier name is displayed, relative to the base item name. For example, if you have a Sword with the prefix modifier "Amazing" and the suffix modifier "Strength" both attached to it, the item's compound name would be "Amazing Sword of Strength." For @Ant, would it be too much to ask that changes to the display name be optional when affixes are attached? Please and thank you.
  13. 1 point
    AK-i

    Ant's Journal

    @Ant, Thank you! ^^/ It's a job I'm thankful to have! Sticking to the topic, as someone who'd like the experiment with the concept of using "hours of the day" as a sort of currency, I'm glad to see you can have multiple currencies! I will admit, I'm a little confused as to what an "affix" is, or what it's supposed to do. Is it just a way of categorizing something? Or is it a little more complicated than that?
  14. 1 point
    ChiaPet

    Ant's Journal

    Yup, I figured an RMDB approach would be the easiest/best way to keep all of these cascading steps from being error prone. Define your character attributes first, create item properties that are bound to that list of defined attributes, etc. Glad you are taking the time to experiment and think things through!
  15. 1 point
    Ant

    Aveyond Winter Exchange (again)

    Posting this to FB everyone. :-)
  16. 1 point
    Mu11berry

    In Pieces (RxD oneshots)

    @darwin Thank you so much, and aaahhhh please set up an art thread I need more te'ijalahad in my liiiife @the world Here is another update, and it is titled very accurately just so you know XD XD (also coincidentally this is the oneshot where the idea of Dameon getting his sense of humor from the Oracle first occurred to me so there's that) (not related to anything but this collection is so so close to being done on fanfic.net and I don't know whether I'm really excited or really sad) Cheese So I have the lamest sense of humor ever and have been wanting to call a piece “Cheese,” or something similar, for a while. So yay me. Most of this was written a long time ago, then scrapped because it’s kind of sillier than the other pieces so I’m not sure it fits really. But… there were some good jokes, and some touching parts, and I figure we can always do with more Aveyond fanficton. So I finished it up and yeah, here you go! Occurs some time, but not a ton of time, after the party has purchased the manor and recruited Galahad. ________________________________________________ All the best cheeses, she had been told, required a lengthy aging process. It started with milk, and then some crazy cheese-maker did some fancy, unpleasant sounding stuff involving knives and fire and tight spaces, and then the used-to-be-milk was thrown somewhere cold and wet and left to fend for itself, sometimes for years. Sometimes even for decades. And then it became cheese, and the citizens of Sedona worshipped it. Rhen herself wasn't so keen on cheese. It was all right, she guessed, but she'd rather have meat. Or dessert, dessert would be good. But there were no paintings of dessert in Frederick's art gallery. She was only even in Frederick's art gallery because he had sent her a dang invitation to a dang special exhibition of his latest acquisition, Man in Hot Water. And he had only invited her on account of her having been the one to bring him Theodore's picture in the first place. It was all exceptionally stupid and Rhen would much rather be in the manor, or sparring in the practice yard. But Elini had told her it would be rude to refuse, and Galahad had looked ready to give her one of his horribly long lectures, and besides, even though Dameon hadn't said anything, she could tell he was interested. So she accepted the dang invitation, and had even made attempts to dress nicely— which was a mistake because the pale red-definitely-not-pink gown she had chosen was sweaty and itchy. And the art was droll. The gallery mostly consisted of cheese paintings, of course. Cheddar, mozzarella, provolone, every kind of cheese in Aia. People dressed in colorful, silly looking clothes clustered around these paintings, pointing out a detail of a piece of swiss or loudly proclaiming that what their neighbor thought was gouda was actually feta. Why was this city so obsessed with cheese? No wonder Frederick had been so excited about the creepy stick figure. Besides that, Rhen saw a few flower paintings. There was one of marion bells that held her attention for a bit. She liked the details of the leaves and the blending of the colors. Okay, really she just liked marion bells, and it was sentimental and stupid— "This one is charming." Rhen started and turned to see Dameon standing beside her, smiling up at the marion bell painting. His smile was charming and she wished he would stop it because now her gown felt stuffy and stiff and her voice was going to squeak when she spoke, she just knew it. "Yes," she managed in relatively even tones, fixing her eyes on one of the pink petals. "It is." "It is decidedly less cheesy than the others." It was the lamest joke she had ever heard, but she was laughing at it and she couldn't stop, and it was very embarrassing. And she knew her face was red now, and she wanted to hide it somewhere, but the only place she could think of was Dameon's chest and she was absolutely, definitely, most assuredly not going to do that— Great, now she was choking on her own spit. She tried to apologize but the words came out more like, "Ack— sah— ree," and she was coughing horribly— Dameon took her in his arms and patted her back until she could breathe again. "I'm sorry, I didn't think it was that funny...." "Er— it wasn't," she said, pulling away from him and looking hard at the painting again. "I don't know why I was laughing like that." Then she grinned in spite of herself. "It was a pretty cheesy joke, actually." "Hmm," he said, the corners of his mouth curving up, just a little. "Well, your reaction was pretty charming." She laughed— a normal amount this time— and only blushed a little, and endeavored to change the subject. "What's your favorite painting so far?" "I... am not sure," he said slowly. Then he smiled again, and turned pink, and couldn't seem to stop himself from saying, "The gouda one was particularly good." Rhen was mortified to find that she was laughing again. It must be just the unexpectedness of it, the incongruity of his serious mouth spouting such nonsense. That was it, that must be it— "Sorry, Rhen," he said, patting her back again because she was choking again. "I don't know why I keep doing that..." When she had recovered she said, "It's all right. Just don't make a habit of it—" "You young people really must quiet down," an older woman interrupted scoldingly, pointing at them with her enormous spectacles. "Art is to be looked at, not laughed at!" Unfortunately this assertion only caused Rhen to laugh again. Dameon beamed at her, which didn't help, and then he offered her his elbow, which did, and he made his apologies to the old lady and led Rhen into the next room. Besides more cheese paintings, there were some portraits of nobles, all dressed more ridiculously than the nobles walking through the gallery, if that were possible. Te'ijal and Elini were standing in front of a portrait of a duchess whose dress was poofy enough to hold seven other people, and whose hair was piled so high that Rhen found herself wondering what she was hiding in it. Seeing her interest, Dameon walked with her to the portrait, and Te'ijal and Elini turned to greet them. "Good day, Sword Singer, Sun Priest," Elini inclined her head towards them. "Look at this woman!" Te'ijal said, foregoing formalities as usual. "Look what she has in her hair! She could stake me with one of those!" Rhen looked and saw that there were long, sharp wooden pins holding the woman's hair in place. "Wow!" she said, as quietly as she could manage. "She could stake me with one of those!" "And look at her dress!" Elini said. "It's big enough and stiff enough to knock over an army." "Or hide an army!" Rhen added. Dameon was examining the portrait with his eyebrows drawn together. "But..." he began slowly, apparently very concerned, "how does she move?" Rhen, Elini, and Te'ijal laughed, which made Dameon turn red, and that made Rhen feel sorry. So with an effort, she caught her breath, and said, "If she's anything like me, she probably doesn't." "Even I couldn't wear that," Elini said. "In Veldt, clothing is light, durable, and flexible. We don't see any good reason for this stiff, bulky Northern nonsense." "I imagine I could wear it," Te'ijal said, and shrugged. "But it would rustle so much Galahad would hear me coming from a mile away." Dameon grinned, and Rhen's stomach fluttered and she laughed. Then she blushed when she saw Elini’s knowing look, and she stopped abruptly and said, "Let's go see what else Frederick's got around here." What else Frederick had around there was a mirror, which Lars was standing in front of, apparently trying to adjust his cloak. Te'ijal grinned suddenly and pulled Dameon away from Rhen, motioning for them to be quiet with a finger pressed to her mouth. Te'ijal stopped behind Lars, placing Dameon behind her self, and she leaned towards Lars so her nose almost touched the back of his head. Dameon looked at Rhen and shrugged, and Lars sighed loudly and said, "Dameon, do you mind? You're in my ligh— AUGH! TE'IJAL," he screamed, having turned around to find the vampress directly behind him. "GET OUT OF MY SPACE! I'LL FRY YOU WITH MAGIC!" He was holding his staff to do it, but Te'ijal just cackled, and that was when Rhen remembered that vampires have no reflection. Elini laughed, and Rhen laughed, and Dameon smiled, and Lars settled for using his staff to push Te'ijal away and to smack Dameon in the arm. "You young people again!" a familiar raspy voice scolded, and Rhen turned to see the old lady with the big spectacles. "Art is not funny!" "Mind your own business, you old hag—" Lars began, but Dameon interrupted him with another apology to the elderly lady, and pushed Lars on to the next painting in the gallery. Rhen hurried to catch up, and Elini and Te'ijal shrugged and followed her. "How amusing," Te'ijal said. "More cheese." "Didn't you hear the woman?" Rhen teased. "Art is not funny!" And then, Rhen had her revenge, because now Dameon was laughing at a joke that wasn't funny, and for a second the mirth even sparkled in his eyes and Rhen felt it in her toes, too— But no one else was laughing, and he stopped quickly and blushed and cleared his throat. Lars rolled his eyes. "You all are what's not funny." Rhen opened her mouth to make some retort— probably along the lines of whatever— but Elini grabbed her shoulder and pointed across the room. Rhen looked and saw Galahad standing and staring out a window very intently. This didn't seem that strange so she glanced at Elini, and followed the demon summoner's gaze until she saw Te'ijal sneaking through the crowd towards the paladin. Rhen sighed. "Come on, we better go intervene." Dameon looked at her in confusion but followed her when she took his arm. Elini waved and mouthed, "Good luck," and Lars pulled out his garlic necklace and meandered back towards the mirror. "What are we doing?" Dameon asked, glancing around, looking for something amiss. "We have to make sure Te'ijal doesn't eat Galahad," Rhen explained, not bothering to point because they needed to beat the vampress to the paladin. Galahad turned and bowed his head towards them as they came up. "Good afternoon, sun priest. Good day, sword singer." "Good afternoon," Dameon said, and Rhen added a quick, "Hello," and glanced back to see where Te'ijal was. The vampress had seen them approaching the paladin and was sulking in front of a brie painting, but still making her way towards them, slowly, slowly. "So realistic, isn't it?" Galahad was saying, gesturing at the window. "You can almost smell the city just looking at it." "Er— yeah," Rhen said reluctantly, deciding against telling Galahad that he was actually looking at a window. She knew from unfortunate experience that he would vehemently deny it against all reason, even if she were to stick her arm out the window. Even if she stood outside it. Even if anything. "It's— quite nice," Dameon said, following her lead. Then, "Have you seen the one of a stickman boiling in a cauldron?" Galahad looked appalled. "No, no, of course not. I am surprised you would say such a ghastly thing! Surely that is not a real painting!" But before Dameon could answer, Te'ijal was upon them. "Duckling!" she greeted excitedly, and Galahad screamed. "Creature of the night! Why do you torment me?" "If you young people do not quiet down—" the bespectacled old lady began, before gaping at Galahad and Te'ijal. "Oh, I'm sorry, Sir Galahad! I did not realize that was you— I thought it was—" she stared at Rhen and Dameon, and started to point but thought better of it, "Um— uh— have you seen the featured piece, sir? Man in Hot Water? Quite original, I assure you. It's just in the next room. I could give you a tour, if you'd like—" "Lady, cease your blathering," Galahad said, standing erect even though Te'ijal was playing with his hair now. "Speeches are best made concise and clear. There is no need for all this— insufferable— insensate— demonic— devil woman, get out of my hair!" he roared, whirling on the vampress. Te'ijal only laughed and reached for his nose. Galahad sprang backwards, nearly knocking over a very shocked and muddled spectacle-wearing old lady, and he turned and ran from the gallery with Te'ijal at his heels. "What— well!" the old lady said, drawing herself up. She looked sharply at Rhen. "At least you seem to have ceased your senseless laughter!" Rhen flushed angrily. It was an unfair thing to say, it was unnecessary, and embarrassing— "That— that was my fault," Dameon said quickly, stepping in front of her. "And I think her laugh is lovely." He turned and smiled at her and she flushed for a different reason and looked at her boots. The old lady sniffed and turned away from them, waving her enormous spectacles in the air dismissively. "Come on," Dameon said, pulling Rhen towards the next room, "let's go see the rest of Frederick's collection." "Well, all right," Rhen said, trying to ignore how warm her face felt. "I didn't get to look at Theodore's piece yet." Dameon grinned and escorted her to where Man in Hot Water hung. There was a cluster of rich people around it, having a heated discussion. Lars' voice shouted over some of the others. "The artist is not a noble! He's a child from New Witchwood!" "That' ridiculous!" one of the men countered. "Only the gifted and monetarily endowed get into the Gentle Children's school!" "You're ridiculous!" Lars argued. "Theodore doesn't have to be a noble to be gifted and rich!" It was such an incongruous thing to hear that Rhen laughed. Dameon looked at her in confusion. "What is funny?" She shook her head and explained, "It's funny how people change." He stared at her, and there was no laughter in his eyes. He cleared his throat and looked at the ground. "I suppose sometimes it is." She wasn't sure what, exactly, he was thinking, or how she was supposed to respond to that, so she ended up tucking his hair behind his ear, and saying, "I'm glad you haven't changed." But it was the wrong thing to say. He stepped away from her, still staring at the ground, and said, so lowly she almost didn't hear, "I am changing every day. Everything changes." She narrowed her eyes at him. "What's the matter, Dameon?" He tried to smile, but it wasn't convincing. "Why don't we go see what other treasures Frederick has collected?" "Hmm. I'll bet you one million gold pennies that nearly everything else is cheese." But he didn't laugh. He just walked on towards the next painting. And it was cheese, and so was the next one. Mozzarella and ricotta and parmesan. There was one of some moldy, unrecognizable cheese that had apparently been painted by a gnome, and the lady standing in front of it assured Rhen that it was "Priceless! Priceless!" But Rhen would much have preferred another stupid joke. Dameon was stopped in front of a smaller painting, one with a brown block-looking thing in the middle. Brunost? No, it actually wasn't cheese, for once. It was a neat little house, sitting tranquilly on top of a hill, with the door hanging open like it didn't know how to close, and light pouring out of it as if to say, come in. It was nowhere she had been, but it was somehow familiar to her. "Do you remember," Dameon began quietly, "when home looked like that?" Clearwater had never looked like that. Well, not exactly like that. The houses in Clearwater were made of white stones, and they rested on plateaus. But... she remembered the way their windows used to glow at sunset, calling all the children to come inside. She remembered being one of the children. But that was before— before it all changed. Before she had changed. Dameon was looking up at the painting, like if he stared long enough he could make it real, he could bring it back. He had been a child once, she realized. He hadn't chased sheep, or picked marion bells, but— he had lost something, too. He had been very reserved when she first met him, even stiff. And now— "Dameon," she said, and reached for his elbow. "Not all change is bad. Sometimes— sometimes things get better." Now, finally, he looked at her, but she could tell he didn't believe her. Well. Maybe he was more serious than her, but she was definitely more stubborn. So she took another step closer, and said, with all the solemnity her soul possessed, "Milk can change into cheese, you know. And then the people in this city paint it, and hang it on their walls, and— worship it.” He stared at her and she tried to look serious, and then one little corner of his mouth curved upwards. "They are fools." "They are," she agreed. And then she confided, quickly, before she could lose her nerve, "But I think I am, too." He frowned again. "No," he said, and now he stepped closer, the tiniest bit. "No, you are just— you are—" he seemed to search for the word and she wondered what sort of horrid thing he was about to reveal about her, stubborn, clumsy, childish— And then he finished, very slowly and softly, "You are wise." She turned the color of one of those confounded apples from Clearwater, and she looked at the ground and had to clear her throat twice before she could stammer, "Well— you're just— cheesy." He laughed so hard that she thought he would suffocate, and now she got to pat his back. And then the bespectacled old lady kicked them out of the gallery, so they had to wait outside for everyone else, and everyone else took forever— But it was okay, because when he had caught his breath he leaned towards her, and his eyes sparkled with the secret he was about to tell her. "I know at least one thing that won't change," he said, and then, slowly and solemnly, he pressed his lips to her forehead.
  17. 1 point
    AK-i

    Ant's Journal

    Haven't been able to get on much due to having a new job that takes up a lot of my free time, but I did want to pop in and say this is looking great! It seems very organised and easy to read, and I am excited to see what can be done with it!
  18. 1 point
    Duffer123

    Ant's Journal

    @Ant, Yep. Like Vitals/Meters. And screen above. Presumably you can attach currency value to core items as well as affixes...? In currency there is usually a core buy value if buyable and a core sell value or percentage if sellable...
  19. 1 point
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    Can you tell me more about how you would like to see something like this set up?
  20. 1 point
    Duffer123

    Ant's Journal

    @Ant, It's coming along nicely. Some further observations... - you probably need to be less prescriptive with items and affixes re how they effect stats, attributes, skills, resistances etc so user can select all this. ie. don't force user to adhere to your structures and named stats - with affixes in general, I like the idea of just 6 in general. - it would be good though to allow for their placement around the item ie. Before or after it and where in naming. - ability to add logic to avoid seemingly conflicting affixes on an item. - loot table weighting and rarity and perhaps value and how affixes affect this perhaps simply as stats effected. - Hero Actions to create items with loot-weighted affixes in runtime.
  21. 1 point
    Ant

    Ant's Journal

    @ChiaPet Here is a quick run through of your questions: Custom attributes: yes, this is something that needs to be added. Yes and this is VERY important. I will also be creating custom actions specifically for this system. @Duffer123 I've created a new database for Affix Types. You can now create specific affix types and assign these to affixes. I've also spent some time studying the Diablo 3 affix system. I'm getting rid of prefix and suffix (for now) and just allowing you to attach up to 6 affixes to an item. You will note below that you can't select an affix type yet, but this will change (I ran out of time tonight). Tomorrow, I'm going to update the database for Items so that you first select an affix type and then an affix that belongs to this type. Socket types will follow. The items database canvas layout looks a bit cluttered to me, so I'm also going to think about an easier to way to layout the fields. Maybe make sections collapsable, use stronger colors, etc.
  22. 1 point
    darwin

    In Pieces (RxD oneshots)

    Aaa, I'm glad to hear it! You're welcome! Confounded) Ooo, glad to be a test reader for the new system! I definitely think it came across well. Matter of Preference) Oh my goodness I LOVE the idea of Dameon getting his sense of humor from the Oracle, that's real cute and charming. I definitely think that came across! Retreat!) I definitely agree, I love when fics acknowledge all she's had to deal with & I think you've done a really good job of it in this fic. Covey Balm) You're welcome!! They're my favorite characters Ever so I really love when I find fic that does them well. YEAH the anger line definitely came across super well! shdhshdhs I would definitely not object to a movie in general, or including some of these scenes. If only... Absolutely! I came here expecting R/D (and you have absolutely delivered), but it's fun to see how the rest of the party is incorporated so seamlessly Of course!! Thank you for the wonderful fanfic! (Aaaaa thank you so much! It's a crop from a piece of te'ijalahad fanart I drew - one of these days I'll set up an art thread on here.)
  23. 1 point
    cruelcore1

    Ahriman's Prophecy (REBOOT)

    If you want, I can help you out by doing some music. I usually make rave tracks, but have made 2 vocal-less pop tracks too. If I'd be making MIDI format tracks like in original AP, that should be easier. I consider myself to be good with melodies. Rave tracks (example of 4): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzNEngScxnUY7xzdx-xwto2-Mstsf0tBl Pop tracks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E4881E19407F64F
  24. 1 point
    I know I've been absent lately, but ALL RIGHT, it's finished. “Life in Sedona” By EsmeAmelia Chapter 10 Darkness poured into the bedroom on a moonless night. The dark, once Te’ijal’s familiar, comfortable world, now a world where she could see nothing. A world where she felt . . .alone, even though her husband was sleeping right next to her. She stared up into the dark that seemed to go on forever. Forever . . . Forever, once a word she savored, once a word that adaquately described why it was better to be a vampire than a human. Forever, once everything she had, the only amount of time she would accept. She rolled over to face her husband, tempted to think that the bed was the reason why she couldn’t sleep, tempted to get back on the floor . . . but something told her that even if she were to lie on the floor, she still wouldn’t be able to sleep. This was ridiculous. Vampires never had trouble sleeping – they could just lie in their coffins and be out in minutes. Then they would always wake up refreshed and ready to hunt some more. It was stupid, how humans could lie in bed for hours without getting any rest. “Galahad?” she found herself saying without thinking about it. Galahad groaned. “Galahad?” Te’ijal repeated, nudging her husband. “Mmmm?” Galahad muttered. Te’ijal nudged him harder. “Galahad, I can’t sleep.” Galahad seemed to wake up at least a little when she said that. “What’s bothering you?” he mumbled. “Nothing, I just can’t sleep,” Te’ijal quickly responded. “It’s probably this stupid bed.” “Oh come on,” said Galahad, now fully awake. “You’ve been sleeping just fine in the bed.” He reached over to touch her shoulder. “Really, what’s wrong?” What was wrong? She wanted to think it was just the bed . . . but no, it wasn’t. It was something else entirely. “Galahad . . .” she whispered, “. . . do you ever wonder what the world will be like in another three hundred years?” “No,” Galahad said, so quickly that it sounded like he was in denial again. “Well I do,” Te’ijal said matter-of-factly. “Doesn’t it sadden you to think that we won’t be around to see it?” Her husband sighed. “I’ve been around for over three hundred years. That’s an incredibly long life, more than enough for a human.” Te’ijal growled. “Well if you really think you’ve lived long enough, why don’t you just kill yourself here and now? It’s easy for a human.” There was a moment of awkward silence before she continued. “No, you don’t want to do it now, do you? Because you enjoy living, no matter how long you’ve been around.” His continued silence sent the very certain message that she was right, providing more fire for her speech. “We are old, Galahad. In another fifty years or so we’ll be dead. Just fifty years! Doesn’t that bother you?” Galahad remained silent. Now it was Te’ijal’s turn to sigh. “No, I suppose it doesn’t. After all, you spent three hundred years trying to become human again, never stopping to appreciate the glorious gift of immortality. A gift I gave you.” She rolled to her back, once again staring up at the endless darkness. “I’m not going to make one thousand.” Her breath shortened as the notion seemed to pound on her. “Other vampires have eternity, but I’m not even going to last a full millennium.” She realized that she probably sounded insane to her husband, her husband who never appreciated the vampire existence, who still thought eighty years was a perfectly good lifespan. Humans were like dogs, content with their incredibly short lives. “Well I’m not either,” Galahad finally whispered. “But I was so close to it,” Te’ijal lamented. “It’s like the goddess wanted to tease me by bringing me almost to one thousand but then taking me away before I actually reached it.” Galahad again seemed at a loss for words. He reached over and pressed his hand against his wife’s cheek, as if he thought that would make everything all right. Humans. Always trying to fix things they couldn’t do anything about. “I’ve seen so much . . .” she whispered, almost unaware that she was speaking. “I’ve seen cities rise and fall and rise again. I’ve seen triumph over evil, I’ve seen the world change so much that it’s hardly recognizable. But now . . .” She didn’t know what she was about to say, but Galahad gently pushed her face so it was once more facing him. Though she couldn’t see him, she found herself grateful for the gesture. “We knew the great Rhen Pendragon,” she whispered. “Back before she became the beloved queen of Thais. Remember how happy Edward was when we told him about her?” “Yes,” Galahad said carefully. “Previously he only knew his anscestor through books and historical documents,” Te’ijal continued. “But we . . . we remember her. We heard her laugh. We witnessed her and Dameon falling in love. We saw her power when she used the Sword of Shadows.” “Yes,” Galahad repeated in an awkward tone. “And when we die . . .” Te’ijal felt a lump forming in her throat, “. . . our memories will be gone. This world’s last true link to Rhen Pendragon will be gone.” "What about the Druids? The Oracle?" "You and I both know that they're not supposed to mingle in human affairs unless necessary," Te'ijal groaned. "They certainly won't go around telling stories about Rhen." Galahad gave a long, deep sigh. “We can write about her.” “Writings can be lost,” Te’ijal argued. “They aren’t always,” said Galahad. “We could hire a printer to make our writings into a book. Perhaps people would read it.” “Would they believe it?” Te’ijal sighed loudly. “A book written by a pair of humans who claim they used to be vampires?” “Our friends would believe it.” Galahad stroked his wife’s cheek. “Mel and Edward are King and Queen now – I’m certain their influence could help.” “Perhaps . . .” was all Te’ijal could say. Were they actually King and Queen now? Mel hadn’t actually told Te’ijal about her life as a princess in any of her letters. Mel’s letters were always full of encouragement, telling Te’ijal to keep going, that things would get better, and yet they were surprisingly lacking in details about Mel’s own life. Was being a princess really so boring that Mel felt no need to write about it . . . or was Mel hiding something? Te’ijal suddenly felt a burst of anger. Did Mel no longer trust Te’ijal now that she had become a weakling human?? Did Mel think Te’ijal was now unable to help her?? What could Mel be up to? Marriage difficulties? Pressure to rule? Pregnancy? "Yes, we're mortal," Galahad said suddenly. "But that makes our time here all the more precious." "The excuse humans use to justify their short lives," Te'ijal mumbled. "But it's true," Galahad persisted. He cupped her face in his hands and ran his thumb down her hairline. "When we know our lives will end someday, that makes it all the more important to savor them, to do what you want to do now and not put it off indefinitely." "Spend your brief existence hurrying to get things done." Te'ijal sniffed. "Never any time to simply be." Galahad gave yet another sigh. "Well . . . maybe we could simply be right now." He kissed her forehead and gently shifted their bodies so he could wrap his arms around her, pulling her close to him until she could feel his breath on her face. Her arms instinctively wrapped themselves around him, her hands squeezing his broad shoulders. Her leg bent upwards so it could wrap around his thigh. Simply be . . . She wanted to say something, but she couldn't think of what. Death was still there, somewhere in the near future, but it wasn't here. It almost felt like this little embrace protected them from all that lay ahead. Almost . . . "Tomorrow," Te'ijal whispered in her husband's ear. "What?" "Tomorrow we start writing. We have centuries to cover and only fifty years to cover it in." Though she couldn't see him, Te'ijal was sure her husband was smiling. "I think that's an excellent idea." THE END
  25. 1 point
    FINALLY a new chapter, one that kinda came out of nowhere. “Life in Sedona” By EsmeAmelia Chapter 9: Flirting It was another Sedona evening. Galahad was sitting on one end of the sofa, his face in a book on Sedona’s history – most likely seeing if he himself appeared in it. When they first arrived here, he had been quite disappointed to see that no one in Sedona seemed to have ever heard of him even though he was once a high-ranking knight. Te’ijal smiled to herself at the thought of her husband finding himself in the history books as a knight who turned into a vampire. She was lounging at the other end of the sofa, alternately staring into the fire and eying her husband, waiting for him to growl in frustration when he failed to find himself in Sedona’s history. “I found something,” he suddenly said, scooting over to his wife and shoving the book in front of her face. “See, I told you they hadn’t forgotten about me.” Te’ijal had to restrain herself from rolling her eyes. Galahad’s big finding was merely a mention of the name Galahad Teomes in a long list of people who had served as captain of the guard in Sedona’s royal army over the centuries. “And yet no mention of how you helped defeat Ahriman,” she said with a smirk. “Such an injustice.” Galahad didn’t seem phased by his wife’s sarcasm. “Don’t worry love, I will find something else.” Te’ijal reflexively made a face, not because of her husband’s stubbornness but because of the name he called her. She was used to him calling her names, but not these kinds of names – not names like “love,” “darling,” “sweetheart,” or “honey.” “Must you call me that all the time?” she found herself saying. “What was that, love?” Galahad asked, having gone back to the book. “That,” Te’ijal replied. “What?” “Must you always call me that?” “What, love?” “Yes, that.” Galahad’s face twitched, perhaps with puzzlement or perhaps with hurt. “Why not?” Te’ijal sighed, wishing she could banish the human feeling of guilt. These human emotions, they were so frustrating. “It’s . . . complicated,” she finally said. “What’s so complicated about it?” Yes, there was definite hurt in Galahad’s voice now, which made that annoying guilt feeling stronger. Te’ijal sighed again. “You once called me the most colorful names, not these bland human affection names.” Galahad’s mouth twisted, as if he were trying to figure out what she said. “Wait . . . are you saying you actually enjoyed it?” “Didn’t you?” Te’ijal replied, stretching out her fingers and pretending to examine her hand. “The way you flirted – it was so unique.” “Flirted??” Galahad exclaimed, his face turning red. “Ah, there’s the Galahad I remember.” Te’ijal grinned at her husband. “The one in denial.” “Denial??” Galahad’s face turned redder. “Exactly,” said Te’ijal, feeling a bit of her old luster return. “You always found me irresistible.” She leaned closer to him, whispering in his ear. “And you ran away because you knew I would catch you. You wanted me to catch you.” Her tongue brushed against his earlobe in a seductive manner. “Come on, admit it. You miss the old days as much as I do.” Galahad was grinding his teeth – the sign that he was reaching his breaking point. “We have gained so much weight since becoming human,” Te’ijal continued with more vigor, exaggerating her accent. “Do you not long for a little exercise?” “No,” Galahad sputtered. “Once again, the denial.” Te’ijal cackled. “I’m sure I could still catch you, don’t you think?” “No,” Galahad repeated, this time with a steady voice, one full of certainty. “Well why don’t we find out?” Without giving her husband time to respond, she pounced on him, growling playfully. Just as she figured he would, Galahad wriggled out of her grasp and off the sofa. Once he was free, he dashed into the dining room, perhaps teasing her, perhaps remembering the old days and genuinely trying to get away from her. Whatever the reason, Te’ijal allowed him a headstart before she dashed after him. Sure enough, once he saw her he started running around the table. Immediately she started running after him – the chase was on. Around and around they ran – an outside observer would have difficulty telling just who was chasing whom. Running around the table reminded Te’ijal of after she had first bitten him. She used to chase him around a table back then too, with Rhen and the others looking on, probably thinking she was crazy. Maybe she was crazy, but at this moment she didn’t care. She dashed around like a child, cackling like a vampire. But of course her human side had to take over soon. Her chest tightened up and she began panting, feeling like she had been running for hours when it had only been a few minutes. Her running slowed down until it was little more than a walk. Stupid human exhaustion. Fortunately, their circular path meant that Galahad was now running behind her, which made him an easy catch. Before he could realize what was happening and change direction, she whirled around and pounced on him, knocking him to the floor. They rolled over each other, settling under the table with Te’ijal on top of her husband. “There,” Te’ijal said triumphantly. “Now wasn’t that invigorating?” Galahad sighed, wriggling his legs out from under his wife. “Maybe a litte,” he admitted. Te’ijal grabbed his shoulders and looked into his eyes. “And now that I’ve caught you, say it.” Galahad grimaced. “Come on, sweetheart, my heart’s not in it anymore.” “Say it anyway,” Te’jal commanded. “If you care so much about your dear wife, you will say it.” The former knight sighed in defeat. “All right . . . if it means that much to you.” Slowly he leaned forward to whisper in her ear. “Demon spawn.” Te’ijal breathed in excitement. “Again, and louder.” “Demon spawn,” Galahad repeated, this time in a regular speaking voice.” A wild grin spread on Te’ijal’s face. “Again.” There was a moment of silence – and then Galahad was the one who pounced, pushing his wife backward and kissing her forehead. “Demon spawn . . .” he murmured, caressing her hair and bringing his kisses down to her cheek. “Demon spawn . . .” He kept kissing her, his voice growing lower and hungrier. “Demon spawn . . . demon spawn . . . demon spawn . . .” Finally he planted a long, passionate kiss on her lips, which stimulated her human instinct to throw her arms around him and squeeze him tightly. It wasn’t the same as the old days. Still, Te’ijal had to admit, this was a nice compromise.
  26. 1 point
    Sorry I haven't updated in ages - my AV3 script has kept me busy. Anyway, here's Chapter 8. “Life in Sedona” By EsmeAmelia Chapter 8: Coffin Shopping Te’ijal had had it with the bed. Every night she lay down on the floor only to wake up in the bed the next morning. Over and over, no matter how many times she told Galahad not to move her to the bed. He continued to live in his delusion that if he carried her to bed enough times, she would eventually want to sleep there. What a fool. Well tonight the sleeping arrangements would be settled for good. She would have her own place to sleep, something Galahad would never dare take her out of. The morgue was full of coffins . . . it felt a little like home to her. This was a place full of death, a place made for death. She smelled the air, taking in the odor of dust settling on wood. With some skulls and cobwebs, this place might feel right at home in Ghe’dare. “Hello, miss. What can I do for you?” The morgue’s owner was middle aged and weary-looking, someone who had seen death far more often than most humans were used to. Te’ijal imagined that she could get along with him quite well. “I would like to by a coffin,” she said. “Certainly,” said the shopkeeper. “Just tell me who it’s for so I can take measurements of the body.” “It’s for me,” Te’ijal said casually, forgetting that humans didn’t usually buy coffins for themselves. The shopkeeper raised an eyebrow, as if he thought he hadn’t heard her right. “I’m sorry, who’s it for again?” “It’s for me,” Te’ijal repeated with a hint of annoyance, stretching out her arms to the side. “Now are you going to measure me or not?” The shopkeeper started with a snicker, then it became a guffaw, then it became a full-blown fit of laughter. “It’s for you?” he chortled. “Bit early to prepare for that, isn’t it?” He started pounding his fist on the desk in amusement. “Come on, you’re what, thirty? You don’t look a day older than that.” “I assure you, I am much older,” Te’ijal declared, glaring at the stupid human, but that only caused him to laugh even harder. “Oh sure, much much older,” he said in a hysterical tone. “Just how old would that be?” “I’m eight hundred and thirty-seven1” Te’ijal snapped, slamming her own fist on the desk. Now the shopkeeper was laughing so hard that he was gasping for breath. “Okay . . . stop . . . stop . . . I can’t take anymore . . .” Te’ijal bared her blunted teeth as if about to bite him. “I used to be a VAMPIRE, you idiot!” The shopkeeper was apparently laughing too hard to speak anymore. “It’s true!” she continued, growing angrier by the moment. “I was a vampire until this stupid orb turned me back into a human.” She ground her fangless teeth as tears started pouring out of the shopkeeper’s eyes from laughter. “I probably ate your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather!” “Well how did he taste?” the shopkeeper managed to ask before breaking down in laughter once again. Hiccups were beginning to crack into his laughing fest. Te’ijal growled. “I assure you, if I still had my fangs you wouldn’t be laughing.” She leaned forward, wishing her glare still had the impact it once had. “You would be dead.” She stormed out of the building, leaving the stupid shopkeeper to deal with his hiccups. - - - - - - - That night, as the former vampire couple got ready for bed, Te’ijal crawled into bed next to her husband, much to his surprise. “Te’ijal?” he exclaimed. “Aren’t you going to sleep on the floor?” “What’s the point?” Te’ijal grumbled, pulling the covers over her. “You’ll just put me into bed anyway.” “Well . . .yes, that’s true,” Galahad said, a hint of disappointment in his voice rather than triumph. Te’ijal suspected that her husband might have enjoyed carrying her to bed all those nights. In fact, she would probably bet money that he had. “Why the change of mind?” Galahad continued. “I don’t want to talk about it,” Te’ijal answered in a near whisper. “Did something happen?” Galahad persisted. “If something did, it would be my own affair, not yours,” Te’ijal snapped. “Just because I’m a human now doesn’t mean I have to report everything to you.” She sank her head into the pillow, facing away from her husband, already feeling the awful confinement on her head and neck. What she wouldn’t give for a coffin, something that supported her body instead of scrunching it up. But no, she couldn’t even pay for a coffin in this body. When Galahad went several minutes without responding, she sighed. She knew she shouldn’t take her anger out on him – he was trying his hardest to help her. In fact, if she looked at it objectively, she was lucky that he hadn’t walked out on her as soon as he became a human again. Why hadn’t he done just that? He had tried to escape her countless times when they were vampires, after all, though after the first hundred years or so it became a sort of game for them. He wasn’t aware that it was like a game, of course, but she used to delight in the chase. And the names he called her afterward – every time he yelled at her it made her smile with the knowledge that he was in denial, that it was his way of flirting, even if he didn’t know it. But now there was no mystique about his feelings for her – it was all overt now. In some ways it was relieving . . . but in others it made her long for the old days even more. Vampires always preferred an air of mystique. A sudden noise interrupted her thoughts. For a moment she wondered what it was before she realized it was Galahad – snoring. He snored as a human – she didn’t usually hear it since he was always determined to stay awake long enough to carry her to bed. It was cute. She rolled over to face her husband and gently put her hand on his cheek. She still wasn’t comfortable, but Galahad’s presence would certainly make this sleeping-in-a-bed thing easier.
×