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Mizzou

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Everything posted by Mizzou

  1. I find it hard to have an educated opinion of the events since the reporting has been so-so. If you formed an opinion of how the protesters have been behaving based on the images that they keep showing from Saturday, you'd think that it was very violent but it was only a small portion of the protesters that were actually violent. Personally, I think those protesters are a bunch of idiots. As for the actions of the police, or at least the reporting of it, the journalists can be petty at times and the tone of reporting of the police changed very quickly once they got caught up in the arrests.
  2. I find it hard to have an educated opinion of the events since the reporting has been so-so. If you formed an opinion of how the protesters have been behaving based on the images that they keep showing from Saturday, you'd think that it was very violent but it was only a small portion of the protesters that were actually violent. Personally, I think those protesters are a bunch of idiots. As for the actions of the police, or at least the reporting of it, the journalists can be petty at times and the tone of the reporting of the police actions changed very quickly once they got caught up in the arrests.
  3. Mizzou

    World Cup

    I'm a huge soccer fan and have been watching the games as often as I can, though I could do without the vuvuzela. It sounds like they're playing in a giant bee hive.
  4. Mizzou

    Fairy circle

    You're not the only one. I didn't even notice the crack at first. There were a few times where I had no clue what to do next and would have go through all the areas and hit the hint button.
  5. Where do I make the fairy circle? I have all the mushrooms but I can't figure out where to go now. Edit: Never mind, I figured it out.
  6. Where do I make the fairy circle? I have all the mushrooms but I can't figure out where to go now.
  7. I'm sure having both of my brothers dismantle it more than once with a few parts left over doesn't help either. But either way, I'm still surprised that it works.
  8. I think it was about that year that my family bought a NES. We never had any of the others so I don't have any way to compare. But the NES still works more or less. It usually requires a few smacks and blowing the dust out of the game cartridges a few times.
  9. Here's another one that I tried Common sense -- 54 translations later -- United States :S I don't understand that one at all.
  10. LOL, I could waste lots of time one with this one. I tried two common phrases in stories: "once upon a time" - 10 (and 25) translations later "long" - 54 translations later "length" "happily ever after" - 10 translations later "fortunately, since" - 25 translations later "fortunately" - 54 translations later "good luck"
  11. I don't think anyone has posted this yet but it's covers a number of theories for handedness (if someone has, I blame my cold for not noticing). Handedness I didn't throughly read it since I have the attention span of a gnat right now but it seems to be a combination of genetics, biology, environment, social, etc....in other words, scientists aren't really sure yet and it's complex. And what do you know, there's actually a Handedness Research Institute Anyways, in my own family, my younger brother is the only one who is left handed. When he was younger, he would used both hands for things but tended toward the left hand. The left hand is what he uses for most things now that he's older.
  12. @shadowshed: I don't think you quite understand what I'm trying to say. Sure people might say they have good intentions BUT good intentions have often been used to hide racist beliefs. Jlspence brought up a good example of this where a native child was adopted off the reservation with the belief that they would have a "better life" off the reservation. This was based on the belief that Native women didn't know how to raise their children properly. I know many people who have had a similar experience as what Jlspence described and they don't always go well. This excuse has also used as justification for putting children in residential schools and foster care in both the US and Canada. The Stolen Generations in Australia is another example. Like I said before when you mix the long term effects of racism and deciding what is best for a child and who should raise them, it is not always black and white. Ideally, race shouldn't matter but that's not the case.
  13. @shadowshed: Personally, I don't think it should be a big deal and I wouldn't go as far as saying the parents would treat the kids like slave just because they're richer. But the the belief that parents who are better off can take better care of the kids is a very tricky thing. It may seem like good intentions but a lot of racism has been hidden behind good intentions (if you need examples, I can give them). Also, the parents may truly have every good intention and only want to do what is best of the child but others might perceive that differently. I'm not saying that I agree with it but when you mix ideas about raising kids and problems with racism, it gets really messy.
  14. This type of objection to adoptions isn't that uncommon and it's not just limited to black/white adoptions. It comes up sometimes with international adoptions, especially when the child is from a poorer country and the parents adopting are from a richer country. A lot of it has to do with the imbalance of power, rather its real or imagined, between different groups and the perception that people from the 'superior' group are taking children away from the 'inferior' group. So yes, it basically comes down to racism and the long term effects of it. The unfortunate thing about it is racist beliefs have been used in the past as a justification to take children away and people still remember that rather they say it explicitly or not.
  15. Like others have said before, the idea that male teams are "better" than female teams have a lot to do with social perceptions and views regarding men and women. Aside from biological (hopefully, I'm not starting that up again) differences, I think athletic talent comes from a combination of natural ability and the quality of training. For example, looking at women's teams at the national level for many sports, the ability of the teams can vary greatly depending on the quality of the training that is available to them. Another issue, from my experience, is that there are some leagues that have teams that are open to everyone and teams that are only open to females, which doesn't make much sense. It was like that in the youth recreational soccer league where I grew up. For the age groups under 16 years, they had the girls teams and the "regular teams". For U18, which was the oldest age group, there were only "regular teams." I think they figured that at that point, girls who would still be playing would move on to competitive or high school games. Girls who didn't usually quit playing because they didn't want to play with the boys. @KTC: Another example would be hockey and ringette, though they do differ quite a bit. I don't know much about ringette but from what I understand it was developed in the 1960s as an on-ice skating game for girls, I assume because it wasn't common for girls to play hockey at the time. Like softball, ringette is primarily played by girls, although boys can play. Ironically, I've heard from hockey players who have tried to play ringette and said it was really hard for them.
  16. Oregon Trail...wow, that brings back some memories from elementary school. It was a fun game but the only thing I really remember was the hunting and continually dying from dysentry or some other thing. I also remember the Amazon Trail where you could take pictures of the flora and fauna and it would give you facts about them but I was more interested in the fishing.
  17. I completely agree with PumpkinJam, that I find it strange that there has been no official apology. All this sounds like is trying to brush the past aside without having to admit any responsibility for past actions (i.e. releasing an unplayable game, disappearing without any explanations, not following through on promises - MP3 soundtrack ring any bells?, etc) and mostly importantly any remorse for those actions. I've tried to play the new version but so far the lack of a genuine apology seriously diminishes the quality of the game.
  18. I wouldn't put 'the right to drive a car' in the same category as 'the right to health care.' (It definitely is not included as a human right) What people confuse is the difference between a need and a want. Access to affordable healthcare would be a need since it is a factor that contributes to health and well-being. Owning a car is a want, you really don't need it to live (though some would say otherwise) So that analogy doesn't work very well, at least for me. As for the costs of health care, maybe it wasn't clear but I'm referring more to the system that provides incentives to doctors for doing more procedures or tests or using certain drugs. Sure the doctor benefits but it drives up cost and whether or not the patient actually benefits from it questionable. I guess it comes down to what is the driving force behind providing health care - the health of the patient or money. Also, who benefits from what is a factor. Once money comes into the picture, health care becomes a commodity rather than a human right.
  19. Getting back on topic now...The discussion about health care reform seems to be going around in circles. In my mind, there are a few fundamental issues that make a discussion difficult to have if we can't agree on them. The first is whether or not access to health care is a human right. It is included in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, though I know some might argue about how 'universal' these human rights are. I firmly believe that access to affordable health care, along with other factors that are necessary for health and well-being is a human right. Another issue is what is the role of the government and how much government regulation should there be. For me, if government regulation is necessary to keep the insurance companies in line, so be it. An insurance company being able to drop someone when they become sick or deny coverage because of a pre-existing condition is ridiculous. The current cost of health care is another issue that needs to be addressed (and has been brought up already). The cost of various procedures and tests are unnecessarily high. Not to mention, there are many procedures and tests that are done which have questionable benefits. Some kind of oversight or regulation on the usage and costs of health care procedures would be helpful as well. Another thing that comes to mind is individual responsibility; however, I find it difficult to place all the blame on the individual when they are unable to afford health care or health insurance because there are systematic problems, outside of their control, that make health care unaffordable. @semcrae: You're more than welcome to join in the discussion but broad generalizations will be challenged. KTC already laid out the fact very well so I won't repeat those. Also, you're not helping yourself by making rash assumptions about how old we are and what type of experiences we've had. So far, your assumptions couldn't be further from the truth.
  20. I'm not sure if I'll bother to play the game or not when it comes out, I'm still very unhappy with the developer. The only thing that I'd like to know is whether or not people who already purchase it will have to re-purchase it, assuming that they would even be willing to do that. A little communication from the developer would go a long way.
  21. That's not really a good example. To see a specialist, it's not that uncommon for people to go out of state for treatment.
  22. @semcrae: Ditto on what KTC and Mopiece said about the 'dumbest and most uneducated' generation. As for your blanket statement about why people don't have health insurance, the facts don't support that.
  23. Right, because the current system NEVER causes people to go into debt That quote is amusing in more ways than one...
  24. @Blurble: Obviously, the bill doesn't address hospital management which is another matter that could be addressed. But the bill does prevent health insurers from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions. In case you haven't looked at it closely, here's a short summary of some of the immediate effects. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/22/health-reform-bill-summary_n_508315.html#s75147 Two things that the bill does that are not insurance-related are the 10% sales tax on indoor tanning services and requirement for chain restaurants to post the nutrient content of the food.
  25. I have lived in a large US city so I do know what it's like and I still don't agree with the comment. Not to mention, I work in a health field. Also, I don't think it's fair to assume that people who don't have health insurance are just too lazy to get a job. There may be some people like that but not everyone is. I personally know people who do work hard but still can't afford health insurance but make too much to qualify for government assistance. There are a lot of problems with the way the health insurance system is set up and at least the health bill is addressing some of those (too lazy to list them here).
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