Jump to content
Aveyond Studios Community
Sign in to follow this  
-MoonReader-

Career advice anyone?

Recommended Posts

@KTC: Just out of curiosity, what type of medical career are you considering, something research/lab-based or clinical/working with patients? If you're wanting to work with patients being emotionally detached and going through the motions aren't the best characteristics to have with that type of job. They don't help with having a good bed side manner.

 

Edit: Just in case you say bedside manner doesn't matter in health care, there's a pile of literature that says otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@moonreader: Again, You simply learn to make do with the job and separate your feelings from the job. A job is simply a means to an end. When you've collected enough money from the job and is living comfortably, then you think about whether you enjoy it or not, not before. I'm not sure if it's an asian thing or just what my family and people I know do. The goal is to make a lot of money first before you even think about happiness. Can't tell you how many times the parents go "See how much I sacrifice for you? You will go into medical school to earn a lot of money so you don't have to struggle like me."

 

@mizzou: I'm aiming to get into medical school first before I think about what career to choose. Parents are pushing for specializing in surgery since it has a bigger paycheck. As for bedside manner: let's see if I can even get in first lol. If I can't, it's off to Mcdonald.

 

The parents threatened to pull me out of HS if my grades didn't improve [3.5 GPA was not good enough for them]. Add on the extra pressure of 90% of the school being similarly pressured asians, yeah it was no wonder my HS once had a suicide help program lol.

 

They also threatened to cut college funding for me if I didn't take medical school requirement classes.

 

As such, I'm rather apathetic about the whole thing lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand Moon's feelings.

I love art as well and I would have loved to continue my photography and graphic designing--my instructor would always praise me as gifted student and helped me improve my photography and my photoshop techniques. However, I knew that not only was it too late for me to build a portfolio (for art school--my friends who are majoring in art-related subjects have been building theirs since the beginning of high school or earlier, I was merely a hobbyist that started in junior year), but it's also a gamble on where I would go in the future if I did continue to pursue photography.

A career in medicine really is the way to go these days if you want stability. Personally, I have always enjoyed my science subjects, and the PreMed course I took was Medical Laboratory Science. I don't enjoy it like I enjoyed my photography, but I liked it. It was a good second best and I know I won't end up hating my job in the future.

 

So the way I looked at it was that I listed what is enjoyable to me from greatest to least--photography being at the top, AnaPhy second, etc etc. That way, you can show them to a guidance counselor or in my case, the lady in the career center, and they can help you.

 

Unlike most people, I refuse to have a job that I'd hate in the future--that's why I made that list and had a talk with the woman at the career center. If I like my job, waking up in the morning would not be so difficult and you'd generally feel happier or content--life would be easier whereas instead of having a job you dislike or hate and you end spending a lot of energy just getting through the day because you feel the job drags on for too long and you really desire to get out already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go for a career in science, but you should see what you like. If you enjoy science, then I suggest that you go for it.

 

Money is really important in a job, and you should probably try to go into a field where there are many stable jobs. While money is important, though, you should also make sure that you enjoy what you're doing, because if you don't, you might find it difficult to stay motivated and positive. If I had to go and work at a job that I didn't like every day, I would be a mess. :|

 

Like everyone else is saying, the art industry is too unstable to really rely on, so unless you're amazing, you might be struggling with the cost of living.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then again, guidance counselors can help you with that. They are the best people to consult with career guidance.When I graduated from High School last March, I didn't know what program I should choose. I was looking for an academic program in which:

 

1) I will enjoy the most.

2) I know will give me a good opportunity in the future.

3) Something challenging

4) Anything within the bounds of Humanities or Social Science (except Political Science)

5) Less complex math and science (although I did well in Calculus and Biology in HS).

 

I told all of these to my guidance counselor and I was given some sort of test which took me two hours to accomplish. After a day, the GC told me that I might fit in the ff. programs: (1) Philosophy (2) Literature (3)Sociology (4) History and (5) English Language Studies. I took up English Language Studies (a course inclined towards Applied Linguistics, some English Literature, Reading Development, Rhetoric and Composition) and as of now, I'm enjoying it.

 

Try to ask for a copy of the prospectus of the academic programs in your college. The program prospectus will give you some idea about what to expect throughout your study as an undergraduate.

 

It's not always too late to shift majors, though it will be difficult. There may be some subjects that will not be credited during the shifting. Don't let terror professors/lame professors/too-much-work-giving professors/tenured professors become the reason why you would like to shift. If you think you love something, you will go for it. :)

 

Here's an example of a course prospectus. My university has two kinds. This is the one that I have at the moment.

 

width=500https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/251307_1943471760595_1656518321_1953180_5701861_n.jpg[/img]

 

A little note on tenured professors: My cousin, 26 y/o, is already a tenured associate professor in the Social Sciences (and he's a candidate to be promoted to a full one). Since they have much academic freedom in the university, trying to cope up with them could be difficult, but not impossible. Not all tenured professors are like this, though. Some are cool...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my view has already changed so much from all this advice, i want to thank you all.

 

 

going by what Haneul said, my second most favourite thing would be biology, wonder what i could do with that, i'm certain its a much more stable career than art.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well... According to the Google, some jobs you can get with a biology degree are:

Medical/Clinical Laboratory Technician; Medical Assistant; Microbiologist; Pharmacy Tech; Project Manager, Environmental; Quality Control Specialist; Teacher; Veterinary Tech.

 

So, there seems to be quite a bit of leeway with a biology degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm,

I think nurses don't get paid very well, at least not in my country and I think not in other countries as well.

The start pay might be relatively good, but they don't get too many raises as other professions. That is what I read.

Also, I can't tell you which proffession is more stable and more in demand, because it depends on the country.

However, on that regard, I suggest looking or even registering to a website that gives job offers for jobs in your country.

You can browse which jobs are most common in your country, and see real job requests and what they demand.

For salary you might have a salary calculator website for your country, and see which job pay what.

You might also have some Gov websites that have data and info on jobs and salary.

What I can definitely not tell you, is what kind of profession you would enjoy. That is probably the hardest part. But just remember that even if you find a proffession that you enjoy, there is a big difference working in this profession as:

1) Part of university 2) Part of a real job 3) As a hobby.

You might like your profession, but if the work place is hard and demanding, and the people are not nice, you won't enjoy it anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to do architecture, as you mentioned, architectural and civil engineering (with a focus in architecture) both have quite decent pay. However by the time you finish post-secondary school you'll be thinking of calculus as basic math as with most science based fields. (though not necessarily when you're actually working b/c computers/interns can do the work there.)

 

In the end though, just pick a field and type of job you'll enjoy since you'll work better (thus making hard work seem easier) and have an easier time getting raises.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I went to college, the lady said "fewer than 40% of the people who graduate here will actually get the job they want or even have a use for their degree. The rest end up working at car dealerships." Guess where I ended up? -_-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@LikaLaruku

True, I'm one of those people.

 

@-Moon Reader -

I once considered biotechnology as an option but later decide against it in favor of Psychology. I like people and studying about how they interact with life itself :P

 

As for being someone who studied a certain degree and worked as something else...I'm a psychology grad that had worked in Corporate Affairs (mix of admin, corporate and public relations) and now Human Resource and Admin. During my transition from student life to working life, I had worked as a teacher (casual staff) at Kumon and worked as an intern during my uni term break in an NGO (National Cancer Society) and in Environment, Safety and Health department of a hard drive maker. I also volunteered as a mentor for a mentoring project that was organised by my uni.

 

I've been told by some that my work history has seemingly not very much "connection" to one another since it's like a collage, a little experience from here and there...But it was an experience for me and it helped me see what I liked and didn't like to have in a career so it guided me along.

 

IMO, a degree or any other certification is one of those many steps you take towards your future career. There is so much more to deciding which career is best for you than just what level of education you have. Do find out where your interests lie, what are your strength and weaknesses (abilities, skills and personality).

 

All in all, whatever anyone tries to tell you what is "Good" and "Bad" about a certain career path, you are ultimately the one who will decide if the path you had chosen works for you or otherwise.

 

You can in following situation:

1) Love your job despite the miserable pay it gives you.

2) Loathe your job but love the $$$ that it rolls in.

3) Loathe your miserable job and the miserable money it makes

4) Love your job and love the pay that it comes with (best of both world)

 

At the end of the day, job satisfaction or whatever ways you want to measure your career success with is determined by how you want to see yourself to be.

 

As for stable prospective careers, at least from where I can see, accountants are in high demand anywhere in the world (as long as the corporate and finance world still stand strong). I personally can't do accounts cause I just don't quite grasp the idea of it. I only came to understand it a little more during my work in Corporate Affairs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading all this I'm more than happy that our education in Finland is free. We don't have to pay to study and that's one thing that gives us a little more freedom to choose something like art because it's always possible to study something else for free. Only thing we must pay for school and universities are the books and food.

But here it's quite important to study something you really enjoy and get a job you really like. After all, Finns are pretty depressed in general and Finland is (or at least was a little while ago) the second most suicidal country in the world after Japan. And yes, it's about people not feeling too well.

 

I myself am very happy as a physiotherapist. I'm only a bachelor, but it's possible to do the masters degree in some area of physiotherapy or health care or health education. If I'd have the energy and motivation to do so. And I think I'm not doing it in Finland anyway, because right now my life is slowly moving to California..

 

Of course, my dream is to get into a med school but that might just be a dream that will never come true..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@theone - this comes from a little far back in the thread but you questioned how if you dislike studying engineering how can you like the job...I just have to say that often times jobs can be totally different than university classes. I'm a marketer and my hubby's an engineer...both of us are working in our fields and the actual application is completely different from trying to study the disciplines. Unless you do co-op, or are doing practicals (like parts of teachers college, nursing etc.) school tends to be a lot different than the actual job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found several of my engineering classes to be dull, tedious, and/or confusing. That just told me not to pursue those specific areas of engineering when searching for a career. I focused on the classes/fields that I really did like and I found a career that matched. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always been told to pursue a career in a field that I'm truly interested in. So yeah.

 

So, MoonReader, I guess you could research which job has the most probability of you being accepted and which part of it is the least bad or you're the best at? E.g: Movie industry is the easiest to get into. You are best at writing. Train/aim to be a script-writer. That's what I've been told recently anyway.

 

The internet is also a powerful tool. I've heard of a classmate who got a good job at a gaming company through internet research. One of my friends is only an Associates graduate (a 2-year degree, considered lower than bachelor's) and he got a great job as an artist for games.

 

If you're interested in an art career, one of the most important things is to prepare an outstanding portfolio. That is, MAKE SUPER AWESOME ART THAT PEOPLE WILL PRACTICALLY FAINT WHEN THEY SEE IT :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I honestly think it's important to do a job you have an interest in. Otherwise, you will be completely miserable and want to do something else. I am in nursing and am fortunate that it is something I like and is something that pays the bills, too.

 

However, you have to be realistic, too. Some fields are harder to get into than others. For example, I can be a nurse with just my Bachelor's degree. My friend who went into microbiology will probably need to get her PhD to get into academic research. If you want to be a writer, know that you will probably face a heap of rejection letters before you get a break, and even then must do many revisions before your work gets printed (and even then, you'll probably only make a tiny profit and will end up working another job to supplement the income).

 

Basically, what I'm getting at is know what you're getting into. Interested in a job or a field? Great! Now what are you going to do about it? Are you willing to get the educational requirements? Are you willing to put forth the effort to get a job in a field that's difficult to get into (i.e. screenwriting)? Will you be able to keep up with the demands of the job? Will it pay the bills or will you need to take on additional work?

 

I find a lot of people don't take these things into consideration before they take the plunge. For example, I had a friend who went into psychology in university, only to find out that she needed to take math courses. Thing is, she wasn't good at math, and so ended up switching to English. Or my friend who is a microbiology major? She's nearly done her Master's degree. She'd do her PhD but doesn't quite have the money for it at the moment. She said that, realistically, she only has hope of getting some kind of lab assistant type of job, which she could have easily gotten with a college diploma in a fraction of the time it took her to get her Master's for much, much less money/debt.

 

And I really can't count the amount of people who go into some vague area of study, hoping for a job at the end, without ever actually having a specific job in mind. They are often the ones who end up working jobs totally unrelated to their field of study.

 

If you are interested in a job or field, I'd suggest looking into what it takes to do it and talk to people who are actually doing these things so you can see what it's like and if it's right for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@everyone, thanks alot for all you useful advice! wow, so many things to consider! i am grateful i posted this thread!

 

right now, the most appealing job for me would be architecture, it has a required average that i will hopefully be able to score with ease, and is very demanded here, according to my research, but as some of you mentioned earlier, you have to be exceptionally good, so i am in a mess right now.

however, my main goal now is to get the grades, then i will think about that. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×