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The Necessity of an MA/MS/Ph.D.

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Before anything else, let me clarify that the name on my signature is not true. I am a part-time research associate, though, focusing more on my major (English Language) and sometimes going in other social sciences. One of my dreams is to be an educator teaching anything related to the English Language (whether it's about pragmatics, syntax, stylistics, or the root of the English Language), and to explore other languages and how language is a culture unifier. Many of my friends are motivating me to have an MA. There are also some rooting for me to pursue a Ph.D, but I know the misery of doing a dissertation. Hence, it's still questionable if I'm going to go that far. My cousin got his at a young age, but... well, you know what I mean. >_>

 

http://theflame.pcriot.com/marequire.html

 

I read this article about the requirement of having a Master's degree in order to be eligible to teach in a university. When this policy was implemented in my university, many professors (those only with a bachelor's degree) protested. Many of them were given "formal goodbye/thank you letters", while many voluntarily resigned, some signed waivers and some pursued their post-graduate degree.

 

I asked my cousin about his views about this. He told me, as a professor in Anthropology and History, that the rule in itself is reasonable to an extent. Not all MA/MS and Ph.D. holders are efficient teachers, and even told me of a time when his dissertation adviser did nothing at all to help him, even through any of the core, major, and cognate courses in their curriculum in which he was the assigned professor. Fortunately, he passed and received his doctorate four years ago. He told me that "while a post-grad degree is important, it does not make the creature a good educator, particularly if he knows well the college environment, compares it to a regular workplace, and takes full advantage of it."

 

I really don't think a post-graduate degree is the best evidence of one's specialty in a field, but it still is a certification that you are able enough to be called an authority in your field.

 

I just want to know your opinion about this one.

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I know from experience that having a Masters or PhD does not make one a good teacher. They may know more about the material, but that does always mean they are good teachers.

 

But, I understand why they don't want people teaching that just have a Bachelors. If you just have a Bachelors, then you may not have the necessary amount of knowledge to teach the material well.

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Well, I know getting to have post-graduate is kinda pain, but then look at the circumstances.

 

I must admit, that on some degree, I've seen quite teachers with bad-way-teaching, but they managed to stay(and of course made me all in trouble).

 

And just like Mopiece saying, but I think I can be sure that if you get to have master it, then there's a higher chance that you'll get hired.

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Depends. All of our Professors are great this year and they all have masters. But then again, last year, we had professors with Bachelors who were great too. Overall, it just depends on how good the person is at teaching though I must admit, professors with Masters are much more knowledgeable on the subject.

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I imagine some places are stricter/demand more than others.

 

When I went to university, I'm pretty sure all my profs had their PhD's because their title was "Doctor". It is simply a higher level of education and a kind of "certification". It demands higher amounts of intense research and means you have dedicated that extra time and effort and met certain standards.

 

As a result, if I went to university, I'd expect my profs to have a very high level of understanding in their field(s), therefore I'd expect them to have at least their Master's. But then, I went to a very academic university with a long history and good reputation, so that even teacher's assistants (TAs) were at least working on their Master's. At my sister's university, which was much smaller, allowed TAs to be simply senior undergrads.

 

That being said, your education background does not make you a good teacher, that much is true, but it is more of a personality thing. Some people just make good teachers. I'm sure that even some of the profs who only have their Bachelor's are bad teachers, just as some of them are good teachers. On the same token, some profs with their MAs of PhDs are good teachers and some are bad.

 

When the school is saying they want profs to have a higher degree than their Bachelor's, they are probably not saying those without MAs or PhDs are bad teachers. They're probably just wanting to attain a higher degree of prestige by being able to say, "Hey, look! You get to be taught by people who are established academics in their fields of study!"

 

But to simply lay off people? That sounds rather harsh. I would simply tell the profs that they have X amount of time to reach some higher level of education and give incentives to do so.

 

It's similar to nursing here in Ontario. Nowadays, you need your BScN (Bachelor's of Science in Nursing) degree to become a nurse. However, there are still many nurses who graduated only with a college diploma before this "rule" came into effect. No one is saying that diploma nurses are inferior nurses to degree nurses. In fact, they are the ones with years of experience! But there are incentives for diploma nurses to "upgrade" their education and receive their degree, including special accelerated programs and opportunities to apply for funding.

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