Jump to content
Aveyond Studios Community
Sign in to follow this  
Mizzou

'Kevin Bacon' theory confirmed

Recommended Posts

Here's an interesting news article. If you're not familiar with the 'Kevin Bacon' theory, it's also known as the 'Six Degrees of Separation.' It's the folklore that any two strangers on Earth are only separated by six people.

 

This was recently confirmed by a massive study of electronic communication. Researchers of the study "concluded that any two people on average are distanced by just 6.6 degrees of separation, meaning that they could be linked by a string of seven or fewer acquaintances."

 

Here's the link to the news article if your interested:

 

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25988549/ - Edit: link expired

 

Funny, how something that is just folklore doesn't become 'true' until it is 'proven' by science. By the way, I am a researcher myself but can be alittle skeptical about it at times.

 

EDIT: the original article seems to be expired. So here's a link to a similar article

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/aug/03/internet.email

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always have to laugh when the average number of people is reported with a portion of a person (i.e. 0.6 people). I get a rather creepy image of only part of a person walking around in my head.

 

I'm not sure how population growth would affect the number but I could imagine that the increased use of the internet through out the world might decrease the number or keep the number the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I truly believe this theory....have you ever randomly sat next to someone and started speaking. I always find when I do this there is something I have in common with them. And several times I have found that they will know a person that I also know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we used to play the kevin bacon game when i was in high school all the time...to pass the time...that means that the possibility of knowing someone who knows someone (etc) here on on AM is higher than we think...truly fascinating...

 

s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@sargon - yeah, it's an average...but isnt kinda fun to imagine how closely intertwined we all are?...:)

 

besides, isnt fun knowing that you know all these people on here that you really dont know, but might...

 

s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now it really depends what is to know someone.

If someone I walked pass on the street and saw his face is considered someone I know, then it might be possible.

If someone I konw is someone that I consider as a friend, then the theory is alot less likely.

Overall, I am not sure what was prooved. (Although I havn't read the article, because it doesn't interest me much. Maybe I should if I am to participate in this argument. :/)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone you know is anyone that you have a social connection with whether you consider them a friend, just an acquaintance, or even an enemy.

 

the original article link has expired so I added a new one in the first post to a similar article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh, I love this! And I'm glad it's been 'confirmed'. I was told about this theory when i was small...when it was just a theory...and I was completely fascinated by it.

 

So 'knowing' someone would mean having talked to that person, then? Or someone that you see regularly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Knowing' someone is having some sort of social connection.

 

From what I understand in the study, they used electronic communications between two people as the social connection. I would imagine for this you don't even have to have met the individual in person. It could be someone you know only from the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×