Jump to content
Aveyond Studios Community
Hui

Where are you from?

Recommended Posts

Hehe Moony ;P U like Ich troje. ; D In polish now it's disaster band..small people like it but I liked it too xD

Nocturnal yes I can't wait my 18 :D I love in polish language letters Ą,Ę,Ź,Ż,Ń,Ś,Ć,Ó,Ł xD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
^_^ Ah, fortunately no. We use the latin alaphabet. ^_^ with a few special sounds. The Cyrillic alphabet is mostly used by six other Slavic languages- Russian, Bulgarian, Belarusian, Serbian and Macedonian and some non-slavic languages.

 

Ah, that explains why the small towns in Hungary near Serbia have that Russian alphabet as I call it... We were close to the Serbian/Romanian border the day before yesterday and I almost thought it was a leftover from the Russians, even though I barely could believe that. Never knew the Serbians use that alphabet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
by nocturnal-dance on 2009/4/27 1:08:01

 

^_^ Ah, fortunately no. We use the latin alaphabet. ^_^

 

Lol why fortunately :P What's wrong with Cyrillic :P

We also use latin alphabet with special sounds too;)

 

 

by Asiunia1008 on 2009/4/27 8:44:20

 

Hehe Moony ;P U like Ich troje. ; D In polish now it's disaster band..small people like it but I liked it too xD

 

Lol a disaster band, I loved those two songs from Ich Troje on Eurovision :D They were in Macedonia once, that guy was hilarious XD I loved his hair, it was green lol LARS XDDD

 

@Jolien you're from Hungary?! Yay :D we have members from every country here :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Moon Princess: No, nothing's wrong with it ^^, actually it probably wold be quite fun to use cyrillic as it is quite interesting.

 

@Jolien: Well, the Serbian cyrillic seems to be fairly new, I think it was adopted in 19th century, but I'm not 100% sure. I think they also use latin alphabet and that these two are interchangeable because the cyrillic in Serbia is said to have been adopted on the "write as you speak" basis. Wish there were any Serbians around here to confirm this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@moony

Well eurovision and show of Ich troje :D Was nice I liked this band very very:D By the way Polish language is interesting and quit of funny xD If you want I will teach you some words ;P and I totally forgot where are you from? ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Whiterose I'm from Macedonia :)

yeah I'd love to learn Polish :D It would probably not be very difficult ;) at least I think that it has similarities to Macedonian just like Russian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Nocturnal: Hmm, perhaps it would be time to stalk Wolfie then... Though I think his name is Ryuzaki or something like that now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I won't give my exact location but I live in the country about 2 hours from the nearest city and 30 minutes from the local town. There are approximatley 20 - 30 people who live in the area and my closest neighbor is about 10 kilometres away.

 

We have mountains to one side and nothing but land the other, Its a bout a 5 minute drive to the ocean. I've lived in south australia my entire life and I love it.

 

I've been to perth (western australia) and to melbourne (victoria). Melbourne was way to busy for me and it seemed everyone was always in "go go go" mode.

 

Perth whilst being a big city seems quieter somehow, more peaceful and I fell in love with it, I could never live there though, I'm a country girl always have been.

 

I hate adelaide (south australia's city), lots of people love it but I could never find anything I liked with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@KittyKatz: I was recently in Australia for two weeks. I'd love to go back sometime and see more of it. I spent most of my time in Adelaide. It was okay but I wasn't particularly fond of it, too many people. I also went Alice Springs. I liked it there even if it was hot. I prefer smaller towns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Mizzou, I'm glad you liked it enough to want to come back, Alice springs has some beautiful country over that way. I know what ya mean bout the heat, I always complain when its summer and we are melting in the over 40 celicus heat but I know I could never live without it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@KittyKatz: It got up to 40 C when I was in Alice Spring. I like warmer weather but that was way too hot for me especially since I was just coming from winter weather that got down to -40 ~ -50 C. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada, by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah too bad. Thanks though. I'm reading through web pages for the time being. This is actally very absorbing. I knew there were variants of cyrillic but i've never really investigted it in more detail. But I think I'm on the right track with my statements. The man behind the reform was called Vuk Stefanović Karadžić

 

Someone gave a pretty atisfactory description on the wordreference.com forums:

 

Until Karadžić's reform in mid-19th century, Serbs and Montenegrins had used the Old Cyrillic alphabet, i.e. the same one used for writing Church Slavonic. When necessary, this alphabet was adapted to the modern language in makeshift ways. For example, on this page you can see a facsimile of the first edition of Njegoš's Gorski vijenac from 1847, which was printed in Old Cyrillic. I have the impression that the spelling was guided by a purely subjective feeling. For example, the typesetter seems to randomly switch between i, и, and ы, only one of which is necessary to write Serbian (Karadžić eventually kept only и). He also places unnecessary yers all around the place seemingly randomly, and incorrectly identifies yats in word roots (if you're already using yats, then e.g. *гнiездо and *звiезда should definitely have one: гнѣздо, звѣзда). In my opinion, the end result was very pleasing aesthetically, perhaps more so than Karadžić 's modern alphabet, but the spelling "rules" were obviously chaotic and awkward. Karadžić made a sweeping reform in an effort to make the alphabet absolutely phonemic. To understand why this resulted in a huge difference between Serbian and Russian alphabet, you need to know how Russian alphabet works -- it has double letters for each vowel, so that the choice of the vowel letter indicates whether the preceding consonant is palatalized. This is very efficient in Russian, in which almost every consonant can be either hard or palatalized, but in Serbian, there are fewer consonants that can palatalize. Also, Karadžić wanted a strictly phonemic writing system. Therefore, he kept only five vowel letters, and introduced separate symbols for palatal consonants, such as the above mentioned љ and њ. He generally preferred to invent new symbols for these than to "recycle" archaic letters, which he simply eliminated. Also, he had no qualms about changing letters that seemed impractical to him for whatever reason; for example, he introduced the Latin j instead of Cyrillic й (perhaps he thought it was too hard to tell from и). If you're interested in the history of each Serbian letter, the Wikipedia page on Cyrillic letters has links to articles on individual letters from Serbian and other Cyrillic alphabets that provide lots of information.

 

This is from: Wordreference-orign of serbian cyrillic letters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×